We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett

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Publication Date: 2 April 2019
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 400
Word Count: ~100,000
ISBN: 0316417270

Summary:

Seventeen-year-old Revna is a factory worker, manufacturing war machines for the Union of the North. When she’s caught using illegal magic, she fears being branded a traitor and imprisoned. Meanwhile, on the front lines, Linné defied her father, a Union general, and disguised herself as a boy to join the army. They’re both offered a reprieve from punishment if they use their magic in a special women’s military flight unit and undertake terrifying, deadly missions under cover of darkness. Revna and Linné can hardly stand to be in the same cockpit, but if they can’t fly together, and if they can’t find a way to fly well, the enemy’s superior firepower will destroy them–if they don’t destroy each other first.

We Rule the Night is a powerful story about sacrifice, complicated friendships, and survival despite impossible odds.

****

Review:

Book three of my finals-what-finals reading binge, We Rule the Night was a solid YA novel about military sexism, overcoming disabilities, and female friendships. It features two of the most realistic female YA characters I’ve read in a while, as well as some fantasic character development when said two characters are forced to put their differences aside to prove their positions in the military. The book pulls clears inspiration from the Russian Night Witches, an extremely successful squadron of all female squadron of bomber pilots from WWII, which just made me love it all the more.

We Rule The Night centers about two girls, Revna Roshena and Linne Zolonov, whose lives could not be more different yet find themselves in an experimental group of female bomber pilots. Revna is a “second class” citizen who works long hours in a military factory manufacturing war machines for the Union. She’s a Good Union Girl who tries her hardest to support her family after her father’s treason stripped them of “Protector of the Union” status (aka normal citizenship) and despite her confinement to a wheelchair due to an accident that cost her both legs. Linne is a “not like other girls” and starts the book having been caught for disguising herself as a boy to enlist in the army to fight the Elda. She’s a practical realist who hates the facts that the other girls in this experimental regiment refuse to behave like soldiers (and dare I say a little edgy). Her father is also one of the commanding generals of the military.

When the two meet, saying they don’t hit it off well would be an understatement. Linne doesn’t think Revna belongs in their regiment because her disability will slow them down and hold them back. Revna dislikes everything Linne represents (privilege due to her family’s high status and the contrast between her image and everything the propaganda posters have taught her) and also because she’s kind of an ass to the other girls. There’s a strong difference in perspective for the two girls, and given their experiences, they’re both extremely justified. What I loved was that there’s never just one magical moment where the two suddenly realize the other is right. They bicker and they argue and they constantly try to prove the other wrong, yet they acknowledge that they work extremely well together.

What I also loved about this book was the scope. This isn’t a mission-to-save-the-world kind of book. In fact, the actions of the book’s climax are barely significant in the grand scheme of the war the Union is fighting. Yet, it’s so satisfying because of the personal victories the characters win for themselves and for each other. It also acts as a fantastic set-up for potential future books in the series (*crossing fingers*) as a first show for the girls to spread their wings and prove to their male counterparts that yes, they do belong in this war.

I am hoping that in future books, the history of the Union and Elda are explained a little more. Currently, we know as much as the characters know, which is basically propaganda and that the Union isn’t doing all that well. There’s a whole underlayer to the war and motivation that’s barely been touched on and it’s all stuff that I think would be really fascinating to read.

Overall, I rate this book a 4/5. I thoroughly enjoyed both the female friendships and the ever-changing relationship between Revna and Linne as they (slowly) learn to work together. I did find myself agreeing with Linne more often, but I could definitely see Revna’s side. I’m fascinated by the worldbuilding and I can’t wait to read more.

Bingo Squares: Character with a disability (hard mode), 2019 Publication (hard mode), Title with 4+ Words,

/r/Fantasy 2018-2019 Bingo Squares:

  • Character with a disability (Hard mode)
  • 2019 Publication (hard mode)
  • Title with 4+ words
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